Terunobu Fujimori : Le gardien des traditions
Terunobu Fujimori
Le gardien des traditions
Zanoah Bia, March 31, 2008
Terunobu Fujimori
Terunobu Fujimori


PORTRAIT EXPRESS

Terunobu Fujimori was born in 1946 in Chino, in Nagano province. He graduated from Tohoku University, then studied the history of architecture at Tokyo University, where he submitted his doctoral thesis, Plans of Tokyo during the Meiji Period, in 1979. As director of research, and a specialist in the history of modern Japanese architecture, he set up Kenchiku tanteidan (Club of Detective-Architects) and carried out field surveys on working-class housing and historical cons¬tructions in Japan. In the 1990’s, with the writer and artist Genpei Akasegawa and the illustrator Shinbo Minami, he then founded the Roadway Observation Society, and duly explored new territories in the urban environment. His career as an architect got under way when he was about 40 - a relatively late start for Japan - with the construction of his own house called Tanpopo House (House of the Dandelion).


Terunobu Fujimori_Takasugi-An House
Terunobu Fujimori_Takasugi-An House


Terunobu Fujimori_Tea House
Terunobu Fujimori_Tea House


He subsequently built houses and public edifices such as the Jincho-Kan Moriya Shiryo-Kan Museum (1992), the Nira House (1997), the Tenryu City Akino Fuku Museum (1997), and the Dormitory of Kumamoto College of Agriculture (2000, winning the AIJ prize). The lines of force which underpin his approach are the use of natural materials and the rediscovery of traditional building materials. In experimenting with the Shibamune (technique of putting plants along the ridge roof beam, typical of traditional homes), cob, and slate roofs, he has embarked upon an avenue which no Japanese architect had explored since the modernists.

Terunobu Fujimori_Dandelion House
Terunobu Fujimori_Dandelion House


Terunobu Fujimori_Interior's Museum
Terunobu Fujimori_Interior's Museum


Terunobu Fujimori_Itiyatei-Outer
Terunobu Fujimori_Itiyatei-Outer


Terunobu Fujimori also uses self-construction techniques in order to formulate architectural plans that are on a human scale, and inspired by the chashitsu (tea pavilions), certain forms of which, such as Ku-an and Takasugi-an, he has also designed. Lastly, as a critic, he raises questions about a whole raft of issues to do with everyday living and urban architecture.

Terunobu Fujimori_Tsubaki Plan
Terunobu Fujimori_Tsubaki Plan


Terunobu Fujimori_Yoro House
Terunobu Fujimori_Yoro House


Terunobu Fujimori_Takasugi-An House
Terunobu Fujimori_Takasugi-An House