Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto : Parabola House, visite guidée
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto
Parabola House, visite guidée
A. Tekuto, February 18, 2008
Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Born in Kagoshima in 1960, Yasuhiro Yamashita obtained his master’s degree at the Shibaura Institute of Technology in 1986. After working turn by turn at Yutaka Saito Architect & Associates, PANOM and then Shunji Kondo Architects, in 1991 he created his own agency, which was renamed the Atelier Tekuto in 1995. Yasuhiro Yamashita has to his name a large number of house projects, but each project, for him, is an opportunity to implement new processes and materials, forever looking for novel spatial compositions. By clearly declaring his determination to limit the risks associated with the industrial manufacturing processes used for housing, he has based his architectural approach on a tireless quest for craftsmanlike procedures.

Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Yasuhiro Yamashita
Yasuhiro Yamashita


In the housing units in Skin-House Project No. 5 (2004), Minimum House (2002) and more recently Lucky Drops (2005), he manages to subtly thwart the small-size restrictions dictated by the immediate setting. As the name of his agency suggests, Yasuhiro Yamashita’s strategy consists in using simple, clear architectural procedures, in such a way that once the building is finished, it is possible to identify the construction process and the cladding structure used. He thus rejects the idea whereby contemporary housing units and the life that goes with them are invited to bled into the cityscapes of urban centres. Yasuhiro Yamashita has won several prizes, in particular in 2004 when he was awarded the First Prize at the AR-D Awards and the Japan Pre-Stressed Concrete Engineering Award, 2005 26th INAX DESIGN CONTEST, Silver Prize, Lucky Drops, 2005 GOOD DESIGN AWARD, Lucky Drops, 2005 Seoul Performing Arts Center International Ideas Competition, 2nd Prize, 2006 27th INAX DESIGN CONTEST, Judge Special Prize, Layers, 2006 9th Nihon Mokuseiren Mokuzai Katsuyo Contest, Wood Architecture Award, ref-ring, 2007 Japan Society For Finishing Technology in Japan, Residential Award, aLuminum House, 2007 Wallpaper Award, Best Bolthole, Reflection of Mineral.

Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Parabola House

The site is located in a quiet residential area surrounded by nature. 5m in width and 27m in length, it is a long and narrow site, which has been constructed 3m above road-level so that on clear days, it enjoys views of Mount Fuji.


Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


As the client’s family spends the most part of the day in the living room, this room has been situated on the top floor, which benefits from scenic views. In order to fully exploit the length of the site, a cantilever has been constructed on to the front of the building.

Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Minimal design and a parabolic ceiling on the top floor are the building’s distinctive features. Splashes of colour provide a contrast to the undulating white surroundings, giving rhythm to the space.

Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


The flowing “three dimensional” ceiling, which dips and rises to varying levels of height, arouses contrasting feelings of “tension” and “release” and gives the room a sense of boundlessness.

Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Thus, even when observing the room from a fixed position, the fluctuating density invokes a sense of movement, which unconsciously guides the observer right through and beyond the room’s boundaries, as if following the flow of air, giving the impression of endless space.

Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


It is normally the floor and the walls that delineate the boundaries of the interior space but in this case, it is the parabolic ceiling that defines its essence.

Yasuhiro Yamashita  - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida
Yasuhiro Yamashita - Atelier Tekuto_Parabole House_Makoto Yoshida


www.tekuto.com