SEARCH
DESIGN CITIES
EGO MAGAZINE
ARCHIVES
The urban oasis
Timeless Spaces
Delphine Bailly, February 14, 2007
Central Park, New York
Central Park, New York
 
In 1857, Olmsted’s plan for Central Park comprised the three characteristics that were his claim to fame: woods, fields and water. Fifteen years later he implemented the same elements in Mount Royal Park. These features became the principles of urban landscaping, designed to offer the practice of leisure and the rediscovery of nature, as a counter current to the chaotic nature of cities at the time, where anarchy and overpopulation were rampant. Wooded areas created scenic views within each of these havens enhancing the natural aspects of the site while emphasizing its personality. At the same time, pastures evoked the grand open lawns of England, to create calming areas suitable for recreation. Finally, wetlands, fountains and even belvederes were designed as more formal spaces for use as meeting places. The whole was interconnected by roads and paths designated for this purpose and for secure access by Park visitors.

Olmsted’s replication of nature was clearly successful, as demonstrated in his execution of the plan for Mount Royal Park in 1874. Always considerate of the natural topography, the planned layout and its sustainability, he approached the Mount Royal project with visionary zeal. Rather than provide direct access to the mountain’s best views and features, he studied the mountain’s various natural landscapes and designed a winding bridle path to connect them, following the natural curves of the mountain. Walking this gradual meandering path today, the visitor can appreciate that Olmsted’s great accomplishment in landscape architecture has stood the test of time.

www.lemontroyal.qc.ca
www.centralpark.com

<   1  2  3    
PRINTSEND TO A FRIENDTOP OF PAGE
BOUTIQUE HOTELS
CALENDAR
NEWSLETTER


North Face Sale